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Our friends at Boner Magazine in Berlin recently spoke with artist Kurt Walters.

Torsten Schwick from Boner Magazine asked Walters about his series of work focused on naked men.

How did you first get into painting?

Both my grandfathers were artists. My American grandfather was a graphic designer at Mobil Oil Company. My German grandfather, who unfortunately I never got to meet, was a successful painter in Munich.

My early love for Renaissance artists like Raphael, Botticelli and Fra Angelico was also a big influence. Their aesthetics and the beauty of their work inspired me to create.

Where do you find your models?

Thanks to the flood of images on the internet, I can sit for hours in front of the computer and look at pictures. I look at everything — from antique paintings to porn images — each image has the potential to inspire me.

I look at images until something catches my attention — usually it’s a specific detail that fascinates me. Sometimes it’s the perspective of the photograph, or the way that the model’s body is positioned, or the way that their head is inclined. It might be something about the light, or the composition that draws my eye.

I then extract the image — play with it, manipulate it. I have a slight dyslexia, so I see some images as being distorted.

What sort of men do you usually feature in your work?

I look for models who have something unique and special. The typical or generic beauty ideal of today is very uniform. I like to see an interesting nose, a penetrating look, or someone that’s not aware of their beauty.

Dive into the world of Kurt Walters

Originally published by Boner Magazine

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“Scott” (2017). Graphite on paper. Sketched from a photograph by Mack Sturgis. By Nik

I love art, and everywhere I look, there is loads of talent. One day I came across Nik and his amazing drawings of hot sexy men. I was blown away by the level of detail and talent Nik puts into each drawing he does. I reached out to Nik for an interview and was honored that he accepted.

“Scott” (2017). Graphite on paper. Sketched from a photograph by Mack Sturgis. By Nik

Nik, can you tell us a little about yourself?

I’m an early thirties guy from a small town in New Mexico. I grew up in a really conservative Christian family and because of this, I was pretty sheltered from things that our church found transgressive like homosexuality. I find it a little ironic that despite this upbringing, I’ve grown up to become a gay, atheist, artist that draws dicks and hairy bums as a hobby. I went to college to study biology and have worked in laboratories in both academia and industry. I now live in the Midwest with my handsome fiancé where I am finishing up the last year of my doctorate in Genetics.

“James” (2016). Graphite on paper. Sketched from a photograph by Jeremy Lucido. By Nik

When did you start drawing and when did you start drawing men?

I’ve been drawing and making art for as long as I can remember. My grandmother is an artist and I spent a lot of my childhood watching her paint and sculpt. She often involved me in her process and would have me knead her clay for the storyteller dolls she made. I’ve always been really close with her and I think that art is a major part of our connection. I was a very quiet and reserved kid, so I spent a lot of my time drawing and reading. My childhood sketches were mostly of dinosaurs and animals — a lot more innocent than what I work on now. The story behind how I started drawing men is a bit unusual. To make a very long story short, in 2012 I had a near-death experience and I am only alive today because a friend of mine was there to save my life. I couldn’t think of a gift grand enough to thank him so instead, I drew a hairy bubble butt on the front of a card and wrote on the inside “thanks for saving my ass”. That hairy booty was the first of what has now become many.

“Luis” (2016). Graphite on paper. Sketched from a photograph by Afif Kattan. By Nik

Is it easy to find men to draw? Where do you usually find your subjects?

I primarily use Instagram to find the men that I draw and using that platform, it has been really easy to find muses. I’ve met some wonderful guys on there that have gone on to become the inspiration for my work. People are surprisingly very open to baring it all for a sketch. I live in the middle of nowhere, so I often have to work from reference photos. It’s been really fun to work together with the guys to come up with poses for my sketches. There are also a ton of incredibly talented photographers I’ve met that are kind enough to allow me to work from their photos. I really enjoy the process of taking their images and reinterpreting them in my style. Lately, I’ve been trying to work on doing more art trades with other artists where we each will work on a portrait of the other. It’s been a lot of fun to have the tables turned and get to become the art.

“Jedi” (2017). Graphite on paper by Nik

What motivates you?

My motivation to draw men comes from a love of the male form and an appreciation of how beautiful I find body hair. Drawing has also become a major source of stress relief for me, so I’m often motivated to draw to give myself an emotional release. I find the process of drawing body hair to be incredibly relaxing and being creative allows me to use another part of my brain that I don’t get to use in my day job. I’m also motivated by other artists. I’ve been lucky enough to be a part of the queer art community on Instagram and every day I learn something new from these talented artists. Aside from a few classes I took in high school and college, I’m mostly self-taught so these other artists have become my teachers. They motivate me to try new things, take risks, and keep improving.

What is next on the horizon for Nik?

I hope to turn this hobby into a side business. This year I’m hoping to begin selling prints of my pieces and hopefully have my first art show. I also have some ideas for some pins based on some of my sketches which I’m hoping I can make and begin selling. I also want to start working with more color and incorporating other mediums into my work.

Nik, thank you for taking the time to share your life with me. If you want to keep up with Nik you can find him on Instagram as en.santi and his website ensanti.com.

Nik is has been a pleasure.

“Hole is where the art is” (2018). Graphite on paper by Nik
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