Connect with us
Daddyhunt (image supplied) Daddyhunt (image supplied)

Arts & Culture

Daddyhunt — the hunt continues

Daddyhunt (image supplied)

Published

on

Exploring the dynamics of inter-generational dating and relationships, web-series Daddyhunt is back with a new series.

I caught up with Casey Crawford — General Manager of Daddyhunt and an Executive Producer of the series — for a behind-the-scenes look at Season 3.

Are you surprised by the success of the Daddyhunt series?

Daddyhunt was wonderfully surprised by the positive reaction to Season 1 of Daddyhunt: The Serial, especially the incredible amount of requests for more episodes. We credit that success with the fact that the show deals with real-world issues and challenges. We continually try to portray the dynamics of inter-generational relationships and other topics in authentic ways, and I think that resonates with our viewers.

The BHOC — Building Healthy Online Communities — partnership began with the second series of Daddyhunt, what was the audience response like to the incorporation of health messages in the series?

The BHOC partnership grew out of conversations that our CEO, Carl Sandler, had with Dan Wohlfeiler of BHOC. Carl and Dan both realised that a public-private partnership could reach the people that Dan’s organisation was targeting with their public health messages.

The audience response has been overwhelming positive. On YouTube alone, the Season 2 episodes and public services announcements have been viewed more than 8.8 million times. We’ve also received countless messages on our social media channels thanking us for incorporating health messages into the show and educating people about these important topics.

Season 3 of the series includes a more diverse cast. What was the casting process?

Dan and I started talking about what a Season 3 might look like right after releasing Episode 1 of Season 2. We knew that we wanted to reach a more diverse audience, and that meant including greater diversity in the cast. Once we figured out the story-line, the casting fell into place.

For example, viewers that watched Seasons 1 and Season 2 will remember AJ’s relationship with the two Antonios. We knew for Season 3 that we wanted to show Antonio and Antonio on the screen, and so crafted a way for that to happen with the story-line.

You’re tackling slightly more complicated health messages in season 3 — is that difficult from a creative perspective?

Any time you’re tackling complicated topics, it creates challenges in the creative process. We wanted to keep the series light and authentic and not come across as preachy, but we also wanted to educate people about important health issues facing our community. I’d like to think that we got the balance right.

Is the series an effective way to attract more users to the Daddyhunt app?

The series does attract more brand awareness for Daddyhunt, and we do experience an uptick in downloads of the app or joins via the website. Inter-generational relationships are becoming more common, and when you do a good job of portraying those relationships in an authentic way, people take notice.

Daddyhunt is a community where we want everyone to feel welcome regardless of age, race, ethnicity, or HIV status — we make that clear with the issues that we tackle in the series. It’s an effective tool for introducing people to Daddyhunt and encouraging them want to join the Daddyhunt community.

What do you hope that people feel when watching the Daddyhunt series?

Our goal is for people to come away from the show with a sense of hope. We’re living in challenging times. In the series, we see that all relationships go through ups and downs, but it’s how you learn and grow from the low moments that will make the relationship stronger in the end. So, ultimately, if people see that inter-generational relationships can work, and that HIV-positive and HIV-negative people can be in a relationship, we’ve accomplished some of our goals.

Read more from Gareth Johnson

We want to hear your opinion

Advertisement

Arts & Culture

Outdoors Cruising: the art behind the bushes

On a quest for anonymous and casual sex? ‘Cruising’ is not dead!

Published

on

outdoors cruising antonio da silva
© Still from "Cruising in the Park", Antonio da Silva (Edited)

Outdoors cruising is not dead!

We have all heard stories of the ‘old days’, before mobile apps and even gay bars, when homosexuality was a taboo – and in many countries illegal – outdoors cruising was the only way for gay men to be able to find a sexual encounter.

Nowadays, homosexuality is no longer criminal in most of the western world and technology is here to stay. Socialising with our friends or acquaintances behind a screen and finding a sexual partner has never been easier. But some still prefer the rush and the forbidden pleasure of a casual outdoors hook up with a random stranger.

If you think that the rise of new technologies and that the closure of gay adult entertainment venues is killing cruising – think again.

outdoors cruising couple

© Still from “Cruising in the Park“, Antonio da Silva

From underground culture to art

Outdoors cruising has been source of inspiration for many artists, Touko Laaksonen (a.k.a. Tom of Finland) being one of the most recognisable names exploring the artistic potential of cruising.

Many young artists have proved that this element of the sexuality of gay men is alive, well and more popular than ever and their artwork exhibited in screens and galleries all over the world.

A brilliant example of that new generation of artists is Antonio da Silva – a young award-winning Portuguese experimental filmmaker that explores the hidden side of homoerotic culture in a voyeuristic and indie way.

On his official site he explains:

“I have always been fascinated by male sex and sexuality. I became increasingly frustrated with how moving image explored this and have begun to make it the subject of my films over the last three years. I do not consider myself a pornographer but a filmmaker who use my background to choreograph short films with explicit sex themes.”

Since 2011, when he launched his first short film “Mates” – an intimate view into the world of online hook ups – Antonio has been exploring many current themes of the gay culture such as fetish, voyeurism and, of course, outdoors cruising.

Each film is a mystic combination of sound, image and movement that captivates the viewer from the first second and has granted him a space in some of the most wanted film festivals all over the world.

From the ‘hidden camera’ documentary style of Bankers, the dance-based choreographic scenes of Dancers, to the futuristic – and almost stroboscopic – view into the world of online gay sex of Spunk, Antonio keeps experimenting and delighting his viewers with the most captivating homoerotic short films.

“Cruising in the Park” – a sensorial immersion into the cruising scene

On his most recent work – “Cruising in the Park” – Antonio teamed up with Fabio Lopes to take us on a journey into the world of outdoors cruising. Moving away from the mainstream staged pornographic cinematography, it combines low angle and close up shots with a real audio experience and narrative giving us a sensation of first-person experience.

And, if just like me, you are a massive fan of movie/series adaptation of dark themed comic books like Jessica Jones and Watchmen, you will fall in love with Rodrigo Penalosa’s deep voiced narrator’s commentary throughout the film.

Don’t believe me, then watch the trailer (NSFW) below:

Continue Reading

Advertisements

Advertisements

Advertisements

Advertisements

Follow Us

Trending