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Chris Vincent. Photo: Linelle Deunk (image supplied) Chris Vincent. Photo: Linelle Deunk (image supplied)

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Chris Vincent has something to say

Chris Vincent. Photo: Linelle Deunk (image supplied)

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Chris Vincent is featured on the cover of this month’s issue of Hello Gorgeous — a magazine published in The Netherlands for people living with HIV.

Chris Vincent has HIV. In this video he shares why he decided to tell his story in Hello Gorgeous.


People have asked me about talking publicly about being HIV+, but I never really saw the need to come out about it, I didn’t see what difference it would make.

About a year ago, my friend Rene introduced me to the editor of Hello Gorgeous. They liked my roller-coaster ride of a story — at my lowest I’ve wanted to kill myself, whereas now I’m sincerely happy.

Nothing came of it until this summer, when I was interviewed and photographed for the magazine.

Yesterday, the day I filmed this video, I was at the pharmacy picking up my HIV medication — I’m not kidding — when I discovered that Hello Gorgeous had revealed the cover of their latest issue. The cover was my face, with the words: “Chris is coming out.”

I had no idea that they might put me on the cover. I was honoured, of course, but it was a surprise. The magazine isn’t publicly available until next week, so I felt sort of half ‘outed’ with no explanation as to why I was on the cover of Hello Gorgeous — my HIV coming out story was all in the article, that no one was able to read yet.

Nothing against the magazine, I’m thrilled to be a cover-boy for Hello Gorgeous, and they’ve been fantastic to work with. But the emotions of the situation all became a bit overwhelming. I went home quickly. I tried to think. I was going around in circles. Then I just put on the camera and sat down in front of it. That’s why this video begins with 40 seconds of silence.

It’s 40 seconds of me not knowing if there’s even going to be a video at all, because I have no idea what to say or how to say it.

But words eventually started to materialise.

You’ll be able to read Chris’s coming out story in Hello Gorgeous, but in the meantime here’s his coming out video.

Sharing the stories of our community
It’s not easy to talk about HIV, but talking about your experience can help to build your confidence and understanding of what HIV means for you. Your story can also help others who are processing their own experiences with HIV.

If you’d like to share your story with the readers of Mainly Male, please email [email protected]

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Life

Wednesday Wisdom: Heteronormativity

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Photo by Ilya Pavlov on Unsplash
Photo by Ilya Pavlov on Unsplash

I find it hard to shake my perception that dating is ultimately about finding ‘the one’ — that you may have to kiss a lot of frogs in the process, but ultimately you’re hoping to find someone that you really connect with, that you have amazing sex with, that you want to move in together and do domestic things with, that you want to introduce to your family, that you want to go on vacation with, that you want to grow old with and live happily ever after.

That’s pretty much what I’ve seen in my family, that’s what I’ve seen in movies. For some gay couples that I know, that’s exactly how it works.

It’s not difficult to understand that from all of our cultural and environmental influences, we’re being conditioned to aspire to a ‘good’ relationship that roughly fits that Hollywood ideal. This is heteronormativity in action.

One of the foundations of much of queer theory, ‘heteronormative’ is a term first coined by academic Michael Warner in 1991. Heteronormativity is the belief that the binary genders of male and female are required for people to perform the natural roles in life — assuming that heterosexuality is the default and preferable sexual orientation.

I’m not making any moral judgements about anyone’s relationship. If it works for you, then that’s great. If you want to settle down with a husband and live happily ever after, then all power to you — that’s what equality is all about.

But it is helpful to occasionally challenge ourselves by asking if our thoughts or actions are being influenced in some way by the heteronormativity that we’re all exposed to every day.

Here’s an example. A friend of mine has been with his boyfriend for years. They live together, they bought a flat together, they decided to get married. They’ve always had an open relationship — that’s worked for them. The weekend before the wedding, he was in the toilets of XXL — a club in London — getting worked over by two muscle-bears.

My instinctive reaction was — “That’s not right…” It’s the heteronormativity talking. In my head, marriage is about monogamy, and that if you were continuing to enjoy an active and open sex life then maybe marriage is not for you. But clearly I’m applying made-up rules to situations that don’t fit the heternomative model.

Obviously, an open relationship isn’t incompatible with marriage. Neither is a monogamous relationship. But this is an illustration of the complexity that we’re all navigating as marriage equality offers additional options for how we define our relationships.

It’s too easy to apply a Hollywood-happily-ever filter to our view of a marriage between two guys. But gay guys are different, we’ve been told that all of our lives, and in that difference there’s power — just because we can get married doesn’t mean that our marriages have to look like anyone else’s, the only rules that need to apply are the ones that make sense to us.

It’s important that we don’t perpetuate the perception that ‘good gays get married’ or that marriage is only meaningful if it looks like something out of a mid-career Sandra Bullock movie.

It’s not easy to find someone that you want to spend time with, to make compromises for, and perhaps it would be a lot easier if there was a black and white set of rules that all relationships had to follow. But whatever your sexuality, relationships are messy and complicated things that really only ever make sense to the people that are in them.

Embrace love, forget heteronormativity.

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