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Sexy silhouettes in Schöneberg

Stefan Thiel presents 100 Berlin Based Men.

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One of the highlights of a recent visit to Berlin was a visit to Schwules Museum in Schöneberg where we caught the exhibition of the work of Stefan Thiel.

The exhibition — 100 Berlin Based Men — showcases a series created by Thiel where he has used paper cut-outs to create sexed-up portraits in silhouette.

For this series — created between 2011–2015 — Thiel used a photograph as his base, and then cut his silhouettes from black paper.

The results are stunning.

 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Denny-selfie, 2012, 100 x 70 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Fred + Chris + Ant Chair, 2013, 80 x 60 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Marduk mit Zigarre und Gürtel, 2013, 70 x 50 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Matthias mit römischer Skulptur, 2012, 80 x 60 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Oliver, 2011, 40 x 30 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Xavier, 2014, 40 x 30 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)
 
Stefan Thiel — 100 BERLIN BASED MEN Rein Ant Chair, 2014, 80 x 60 cm, paper cut-out (image courtesy of Schwules Museum)

 

 
Schwules Museum, Berlin. Photo: Gareth Johnson

 

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Arts & Erotica

Japanese masculinity defined by art

Bara is the kind of #gaygeek anime art we can really get into.

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Photo: @musclebaracigars

I’m a bit obsessed with the style of graphic art from Japan known as Bara.

Bara is a genre of the manga art-form that focuses on sex between men.

Its origins can be traced back to the early 1950s, when magazines in Japan — such as Adonis — began to focus on gay art and content.

A rough training session between a master and his student | Photo: @shiro_usagi_kurona

While Bara can vary in its style, generally it features masculine men that you could categorise as muscle-bears.

Some of the leading creators of Bara include Gengoroh Tagame — published in the magazine G-men — and Susumu Hirosegawa.

I guess you could describe Bara as the Japanese equivalent of Tom of Finland.

Anyway, it’s hot.

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