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Arts & Erotica

How to support erotic artists

The spirit of Tom of Finland lives on.

Tom of Finland (image supplied)
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The Tom of Finland Art and Culture Festival is an annual presentation from the Tom of Finland Foundation.

At its most recent edition of the festival, the Foundation focused on the art of collecting — part of its mission to preserve, protect, and promote erotic art.

Here’s a selection of some of the artists featured in the festival.

Andy Warhol (image supplied)
Andy Warhol (image supplied)
Justin Olerud (image supplied)
Justin Olerud (image supplied)
Mike Kuchar (image supplied)
Mike Kuchar (image supplied)
Don Joint (image supplied)
Don Joint (image supplied)
John Blackburn (image supplied)
John Blackburn (image supplied)
Oliver Sarley (image supplied)
Oliver Sarley (image supplied)
Gio Black Peter (image supplied)
Gio Black Peter (image supplied)
Slava Mogutin (image supplied)
Slava Mogutin (image supplied)
Bruce LaBruce (image supplied)
Bruce LaBruce (image supplied)
Josh Paul Thomas (image supplied)
Josh Paul Thomas (image supplied)
Josh Paul Thomas (image supplied)
Josh Paul Thomas (image supplied)
Hector Silva (image supplied)
Hector Silva (image supplied)
Brad Rader (image supplied)
Jeremy Lucido (image supplied)
Jeremy Lucido (image supplied)
Stefan Pinto (image supplied)
Stefan Pinto (image supplied)
Stefan Pinto (image supplied)
Stefan Pinto (image supplied)
Michael Kirwan (image supplied)

Read more from Gareth Johnson

Arts & Erotica

Japanese masculinity defined by art

Bara is the kind of #gaygeek anime art we can really get into.

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Photo: @musclebaracigars

I’m a bit obsessed with the style of graphic art from Japan known as Bara.

Bara is a genre of the manga art-form that focuses on sex between men.

Its origins can be traced back to the early 1950s, when magazines in Japan — such as Adonis — began to focus on gay art and content.

A rough training session between a master and his student | Photo: @shiro_usagi_kurona

While Bara can vary in its style, generally it features masculine men that you could categorise as muscle-bears.

Some of the leading creators of Bara include Gengoroh Tagame — published in the magazine G-men — and Susumu Hirosegawa.

I guess you could describe Bara as the Japanese equivalent of Tom of Finland.

Anyway, it’s hot.

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